Loading...
Daily Apple | Trending health topics © MSN Healthy Living

Is bulimia going high-tech?

New stomach pump promises easy weight loss

By Sally Wadyka Jan 10, 2013 8:46PM

Being able to eat anything you want -- and in whatever quantity you want -- without gaining weight is pretty much the Holy Grail of dieting. A miniscule percentage of the population can pull it off, thanks to having won some sort of genetic lottery. A few others accomplish it by exercising at the level of competitive athletes 365 days a year. But for most of us, eating mass quantities of yummy foods without packing on extra pounds is just a nice-sounding dream -- one filled with gallons of ice cream, a delicious variety of cheese and piles of pasta, cookies and cakes.

But wait. A company called Aspire Bariatrics is looking to turn the dream into reality. How? Meet the AspireAssist. This new device, which is available in Europe but has not received FDA approval here, is a pump that allows users to get rid of much of what they consume before the body has a chance to digest it. After having a tube surgically implanted into the stomach, with a port on the surface of the skin that you can open and close, you are then able to attach a small device that drains out your stomach contents after every meal. According to the company's website, “the process is performed in the privacy of the restroom, and the food is drained directly into the toilet.”

Eating a big meal and then purging it into the toilet. Hmm, that sounds so familiar. Oh, yeah, it’s called bulimia. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, bulimia is “characterized by recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food and feeling a lack of control over these episodes. This binge-eating is followed by behavior that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviors.” Or you could just pump the food out.

Of course, the makers of this product are quick to assert that it’s designed for use only by the obese, and that patients will be screened for bulimia before being approved. Well, we all know how foolproof that system will be. Surely no one who’s just looking for an easy weight-loss trick (and prepared to pay out of pocket for it) will manage to find a doctor willing to help them out.

One of the selling points on the AspireAssist website is that it allows you “portion control without deprivation.” But I’ve got to wonder what ever happened to just having a little self control (or even, God forbid, enduring a teensy bit of deprivation) in the pursuit of better health? I’m not at all surprised when I learn that one of inventors of this do-nothing diet device was also the brain behind the Segway, the standup stroller that tried to make walking obsolete.

More on Healthy Living

Signs you have an eating disorder
Kids and eating disorders

 

15Comments
Jan 11, 2013 2:08AM
avatar
That's some serious business there. I had a feeding tube. penetrations through the abdomen and stomach are certainly a poor, risky, annoying and painful way to lose weight. But yes, infection might accomplish that.
Jan 11, 2013 2:56AM
avatar

Oh good grief, people leave enough mess in public toilets already, now this?  Custodians will need a pay raise.

Jan 11, 2013 2:32AM
avatar

Why... Just why? Losing weight isn't rocket science people!!!. Diet, exercise ,and self control is all it takes. Now put down the Big Macs, get serious, and get your asses to the gym. There are people on the streets starving while your removing the contents of your stomachs again and again through a tube. That isn't wasteful at all...

Jan 11, 2013 2:27AM
avatar

 

Talk to cancer patients who have had j tubes or g tubes in their stomachs in order to get liquid supplements.  It's not fun.  For my husband, the incision has never healed at the site where the tube goes in.  It got infected and he spent 4 days in the hospital.  I don't always agree with FDA decisions, but I hope they never approve this as a weight loss solution.

 

 

 

 

Jan 11, 2013 2:17AM
avatar

SORRY... BUT THAT'S JUST A NOOOOOOOOO  

STOP BENDING THE OLE ELBOW AND PUT THE FORK DOWN..

I COULD DROP OF 15 BUT TO DRAIN YOUR STOMACH LIKE A COLOSTOMY JUST BECAUSE YOU WANT TO BE A GLUTTONUS HOG...

PATHETIC!

Jan 11, 2013 2:21AM
avatar
Just stick your finger down your throat. It's less painful, and best of all, it's FREE!!!!
Jan 11, 2013 2:45AM
avatar
Ideally, we should be able to 'walk away from the table' and get some exercise.  Unfortunately, all you have to do is look around and see that's not working. 

I think this could be a lifesaver for someone like myself.  Have been morbidly obese for more than 30 years and have all the accompanying health issues.  Tried everything short of gastric bypass.  Don't feel that would work as I appear to be unable to stop eating and would just bust the pouch.

There should be super strict guidelines.  Not just obese but morbidly obese and not just for a year bur for 5 or more years.  Make it for the absolutely worst cases.

Just my 2 cents.

Jan 11, 2013 3:43AM
avatar
Sounds expensive.  That's why I'm offering my amazing new weight loss product, the feather, at a fraction of the cost--the ridiculously low price of only $10.  But wait, I'm not done yet!  Call right now and I'll send you a second feather absolutely free! (Just pay separate shipping and handling)  Call now, operators are standing by.
Report
Please help us to maintain a healthy and vibrant community by reporting any illegal or inappropriate behavior. If you believe a message violates theCode of Conductplease use this form to notify the moderators. They will investigate your report and take appropriate action. If necessary, they report all illegal activity to the proper authorities.
Categories
100 character limit
Are you sure you want to delete this comment?
featured on msn
answers to your health questions
Loading...
videos
editor's picks
meet our bloggers
Loading...
About Healthy Living MSN Healthy Living does not provide medical or any other health care advice, diagnosis or treatment. See additional information